Breakout Sessions

18th Annual Information Literacy Summit

News, Media and Disinformation: Making Sense in Today’s Information Landscape

Friday, April 5, 2019, 8:30am-3:30pm
Presented by DePaul University Library and Moraine Valley Community College Library
Located at the Moraine Valley Community College campus

Keynote Address

The Dark Side of Information Behavior 
Dr. Nicole A. Cooke, Associate Professor and MS/LIS Program Director, School of Information Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Watch the Recorded Keynote Address
We are now living in an age of “fake news,” which is but one manifestation of misinformation and disinformation (mis/dis) and human information behavior.  Fake news is not a new phenomenon, but this latest iteration has highlighted the affective, or emotional, dimensions of how people interact with information – information consumption is so much more than people’s cognitive processing. Emotional reactions to information are what, in part, give “fake news” and mis/dis such insidious tenacity and staying power, and these same reactions can cause us to embrace or reject various types and sources of information, including websites and other platforms. Despite knowing better intellectually, people fall prey to their emotional responses to information because our not so latent fears, prejudices, boredom, anxiety and any number of other emotion-based impulses are powerful and convincing, even if our “heads” tell us otherwise. This talk will address the renewed phenomenon of fake news, mis/dis, and its related concepts but then focus more explicitly on the affective information behaviors that influence our interactions with information and help us intellectually thrive in a post-truth society.

Breakout Session Descriptions

Accessibility of Database Vendor Produced Video Tutorials: Enhancing the Information Literacy Landscape
Lisa Hinchliffe, Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana
Andrea Krebs, University of Illinois at Urbana
Leah Freemon, University of Illinois at Urbana
As learning continues to move online, it is increasingly imperative that librarians make content accessible to learners with disabilities. If we expect students to become information literate, librarians need to facilitate accessible learning however, the demands of being a librarian do not always permit ample time to create instructional videos for the various tools used by students. Librarians will often fall back on those created by the providers of the tools, perhaps without considering quality or accessibility. This hands-on workshop will share a rubric created by the facilitators, which will then be used to assess a video tutorial in groups.

Adopt, Adapt and Improve: An Instruction Librarian Development Program You Can Implement TODAY* (*More or Less)
Jennifer Kelley, Reference Librarian and Faculty Development Coordinator, College of DuPage
Jason Ertz, Reference Librarian, College of DuPage
Presentation Notes and Resources
How would you like to return to your library with a ready-to-implement development program for librarians with instruction responsibilities? Learn how librarians from a large two-year community college created a four-module hybrid program with the flexibility and adaptability to be used as an on-boarding resource or a professional development tool. In order to adopt and adapt this course for use in your own institution, you’ll receive tips on conducting a needs assessment, get a crash course in backward design, and consider how you can develop, renew or expand the instructional practices of teaching librarians at any stage of their careers.

Aligning the Curriculums for College Success: High School and College Library Collaborations
Carl R. Andrews, Reference & Instruction Librarian, Bronx Community College
Presentation Paper
In today’s highly competitive global economy, City University of New York (CUNY) graduates need strong critical thinking skills. More New York City students than ever before are applying to college and enrolling into CUNY schools. This is especially the case with high schools throughout the Bronx, many of these schools are feeder schools for Bronx Community College (BCC). Unfortunately, many of the students who matriculate into BCC come un-prepared for college level research, where information literacy skills are essential. A strong body of literature discusses the importance of information literacy instruction at the high school level, as it relates to college readiness. In an ideal secondary education system, students receive instruction on how to think critically, how to evaluate information, and how to avoid plagiarism; these skills are essential for academic success. As the library liaison for the BCC First Year Experience program, I encounter many students who are in need of academic remediation because they are information illiterate.

The authority of unlikely voices: personal experience as knowledge
Martinique Hallerduff, Instructional Services Librarian, Dominican University
Hannah Carlton, Library Teaching Intern/MLS Graduate Student, Dominican University
Molly Mansfield, Online Learning Librarian, Dominican University
Presentation Slides
A tenet of feminist pedagogy is that personal experience is knowledge. The “Framework,” however implies that only experts can recognize when “unlikely voices” have authority. We will present findings of students’ analyses of their “best source” where they make connections between personal experience and knowledge. Participants will be introduced to foundational voices in the field of feminist pedagogy and asked to engage with these ideas by examining and discussing quoted selections from these works. Using thoughtful questions to guide discussion, participants will generate ways of applying feminist pedagogy to their own instruction work, particularly as they engage students in discussions of authority.

Beyond the checklist: strengthening student’s critical thinking muscles in assessing information
Sally Neal, Associate Dean, Butler University Libraries
Chloe Dufour, Visiting Instruction Librarian, Butler University
Presentation LibGuide
Join Butler University librarians as we share insights on a news literacy unit that we introduced into a media literacy course. We will outline our learning objectives for the session, including a deep reading of an information source’s claims and incorporating concepts found in the Authority is Constructed and Contextual IL frame. Attendees will “test out” one of the learning activities by building a news literacy continuum – where do concepts such as disinformation, bias, mainstream media, and post-truth fit on an information spectrum? An accompanying assignment as well as data from student evaluations will also be shared.

Collaborating with Students Beyond the Library for Increased Relevancy: An Early Career Librarian Perspective
Kate Otto, Assistant Librarian, Marquette University
Taylor Ralph, Assistant Librarian, Marquette University
Integrating information Literacy into extracurricular activities, outreach, and collaborative library events is not a new trend. However, how do early career librarians take initiative in more traditional libraries to change current library culture and build new relationships across campus to better serve students? In this session we will give a step by step reflection of two early career librarians’ journeys together over the last year to start offering student-centered events and collaborative programs at their academic institution. The session will include how we measured program success, as well as interactive elements that encourage discussion and brainstorming between participants.

Exploring Power, Privilege, and Freedom of the Press in a Fake News World
Jennifer Lau-Bond, Instruction and Public Services Librarian, Harper College
Presentation Slides
Presentation Notes
Librarians have been concerned about evaluating “fake news” for years. While evaluation is critical, equally important is a discussion of what “news” and “the press” even mean. In an attempt to address these issues for community college students, I designed a two-part, student-driven discussion investigating the concepts of power and privilege in relation to the news. In this session, I will share my experiences designing the discussion series. In addition, we will begin to grapple with these questions as a group through discussion and activities, hopefully providing participants with new ideas for incorporating these concepts in their own teaching. 

“I use good sources when it counts for school, but am lazier at home”: The critical divide between young adults’ academic and personal news engagement behaviors
Erica DeFrain, Social Sciences Librarian/PIL Research Analyst, University of Nebraska-Lincoln/Project Information Literacy
Presentation Notes
Today’s college students are inundated with news. A relentless torrent of headlines vie for their attention, leaving many feeling overwhelmed, and unable to determine the most important news stories on any given day. Librarians lead efforts teaching students how to critically evaluate information for academic success, but few focus on developing news literacy skills. In this presentation, findings are presented from the Project Information Literacy news study of 5,844 U.S. college students, and insights are provided about the challenges students face in the current media landscape. A discussion about potential gains from librarian and faculty partnerships is included.

Information Literacy in Innovation Competitions
Heather Howard, Business Information Specialist / Assistant Professor, Purdue University
Dave Zwicky, Chemical Information Specialist / Assistant Professor, Purdue University
At Purdue University, a business and patent librarian are embedded in the Student Soybean Innovation Competition. The librarians provide information literacy instruction and consult with student groups to mentor them through the innovation process. Early stages of the competition require students to investigate and report on the marketability and patentability of their inventions. This presentation will discuss the results of a focus group study with competition participants, and the presenters will demonstrate how they help students conduct a patentability search and initial market research.

Integrating Information Literacy into Disciplinary Courses using Informed Learning Design
Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University
Michael Flierl, Learning Design Specialist, Purdue University
Rachel Fundator, Information Literacy Instructional Designer, Purdue University
Attendees will learn about Informed Learning Design (ILD), a new design model for creating information literacy assignments in disciplinary courses. ILD is grounded in Christine Bruce’s ‘informed learning’ framework, which focuses on how students can learn content, such as concepts, theories, and facts, by using information, for example analyzing, and synthesizing. Examples of applying ILD will be shared from a pilot project conducted at Purdue last summer in which six classroom instructors worked with three librarians to design assignments in communication, English, aviation, pharmacy, and management.

The Mechanics of Skepticism: What Climate Change can Teach Us About Belief and Reason
Troy A. Swanson, Dept Chair Library Services, Moraine Valley Community College
Presentation Slides
Presentation Notes
To some, climate change is a simple scientific question to be answered with data while to others climate change is a misguided hoax that could cost our country jobs and hurt our economy. The decisions we make around climate change can help us understand the mechanics of skepticism and reason. This talk uses climate change as an entry point into information literacy conversations. It will consider how educators can better reveal the personal nature of information to our students. Importantly, it will ask us to consider whether we are standing on a skeptical abyss and how we may step back from the ledge.

Meeting students where they are – online
Andrea Jakubas, Research & Instruction Librarian, Illinois Institute of Technology
Presentation Slides
Learn how shifting from in-person workshops to an online webinar format greatly increased library workshop attendance at a STEM university, the Illinois Institute of Technology. Attendees will gain: (1) advice for re-formatting a workshop developed for in-person attendance for online use; (2) tips for making an online workshop interactive and effective, and (3) marketing ideas for maximum workshop attendance. Instructional librarians who offer standalone workshops and are frustrated about dismal turnout should attend, especially if they are hesitant or unsure about trying an online format.

Narrative Storytelling as Flipped Instruction: Using Media to Inspire Creativity in a New Information Landscape
Susan R. Franzen, Nursing and Health Sciences Librarian, Illinois State University – Milner Library
Julie Derden, Teaching and Learning Librarian, Illinois State University – Milner Library
Librarians faced with less time in a pre-clinical nursing orientation partnered with their university TV station to produce professional videos to flip instruction. The orientation shifted from a librarian-focused session to a video narrative, featuring experienced student library workers using scripts by TV production interns. Participants will hear from all partners – librarians, nursing faculty, and the production team – through video and in-person commentary. Librarians wanting to save time and enliven instruction or programming will benefit from insights shared by project partners. Participants will leave with best practice guidelines for do-it-yourself projects if money is unavailable for production experts.

Not Tolerating Intolerance: Unpacking Critical Pedagogy in the Classroom
Spencer Brayton, Library Manager, Waubonsee Community College
Natasha Casey, Associate Professor of Communications, Blackburn College
Presentation Slides
We reflect on our information and media literacy research and teaching collaboration and draw on our classroom experiences to highlight some of the challenges faced when teaching students from a wide range of political backgrounds. We examine the viability of critical pedagogies, which seem to be increasingly and unabashedly framed in terms of dictatorial classroom practices. At a time when many have commented on the increased polarization both in the country generally and in academia, we discuss experiences of insularity and incivility in the classroom and beyond, and offer some alternative pedagogical approaches.

Passive Programming for Low-Stakes Student Engagement and Learning
Meredith Knoff, Learning Commons Librarian, Indiana University Bloomington
Alyssa Denneler, Scholars’ Commons Librarian, Indiana University Bloomington
Mallory Nygard, Graduate Student in Information Library Science, Indiana University Bloomington
Presentation Slides
Presentation Notes
Passive programming offers an opportunity to meet students in spaces they already occupy without adding to an overburdened workforce or budget. It also brings information literacy out of formal classrooms to actively engage students. Attendees will learn how to use passive programming in order to maximize student engagement and how to create an inclusive learning environment promoting curiosity and critical thinking around misinformation topics.
Facilitated by presenters, groups will craft an action plan for their libraries through identifying existing resources, stakeholders, and strategies to initiate conversations on the role and value of passive programming in a variety of library environments.

Philosophy & News: A Partnership Model for Discipline Embedded Information Literacy
Cathy Mayer, Library Director, Trinity Christian College
Aron Reppmann, Philosophy Department Chair, Trinity Christian College
Cindy Bowen, E-Resources & Instruction Librarian, Trinity Christian College
Presentation Slides
Presentation Handout
Recognizing students’ need for better tools and practices with which to engage information, philosophy professors and librarians at Trinity Christian College sought to incorporate information literacy into Philosophy 101 through exploration of current events and media. Recent collaboration revealed and articulated embedded information literacy outcomes already operating in disciplinary practices. Presenters will introduce our partnership model for librarian and course instructor collaboration, learning outcomes crosswalked with the ACRL Framework, and instructor evaluation methods of student work.

Teaching a Stealth Information Literacy Course
Tiffany Hebb, Coordinator of Library Instruction, DePauw University
Presentation Slides and Supporting Materials
How do you reach students who won’t take an information literacy class? Try calling it something different! In this presentation, I’ll talk about my class, “Reading The New York Times,” and outline the information literacy goals as they align with the ACRL Framework. I’ll share assignments, as well as lessons learned. Participants will discuss how you can adapt the idea to your environment.

There’s Wisdom in the Room: Inclusion in the Classroom
Dasha Maye, Assistant Professor of Library Science; Research Librarian and Director of ARC Tutoring, Birmingham-Southern College
Amanda Sprott-Goldson, Instruction and Information Literacy Librarian, The University of the South (Sewanee)
Heidi Syler, Director of Information Literacy and Instructional Technology, The University of the South (Sewanee)
Presentation Handout Packet
In this interactive discussion, attendees will brainstorm how to update their knowledge of inclusive pedagogy, develop class introductory practices that involve social locations, consider biases and assumptions about students and their locations, share ideas for removing barriers and fostering connections, and reflect on what they have learned and how they will apply it. Attendees will take away an increased knowledge of inclusive practices and ideas for how they can incorporate them in their classrooms in ways that will fit their own pedagogical styles.

Visual Thinking Strategies & ACRL’s Framework: How to encourage research confidence in undergraduates
Kayla Flegal, Access and Outreach Services Librarian, DePauw University
Alexandra Chamberlain, Assistant Director and Curator of Exhibitions and Education, Peeler Galleries at DePauw University
Presentation Slides
Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) is a research-based teaching method focusing on a teacher-facilitated discussion surrounding carefully selected images for a student-centered discussion discovery process to take place. By placing the Framework alongside VTS, a librarian and curator collaborated to see if VTS could enhance confidence in the research process for a class of undergraduates. We will discuss our findings from our pre- and post- surveys, two course sessions based on the VTS model, and evaluations of student responses to the course sessions, as well as how we plan to adjust our approach in the following iterations of the collaboration.

“What’s really going on here?”: Engaging and contextualizing the media landscape with high school students
Michelle Guittar, Interim Head, Instruction & Curriculum Support, Northwestern University
Zoe Chachamovits, Program Associate for the Schuler Scholar Program
What do we really know when we look at a photo posted on Instagram? Or an inflammatory tweet? While high school students navigate social media platforms with ease, the act of questioning what we find online and really analyzing what a photo, tweet, or web page reveals is a learned skill. In this presentation, we will go through a series of in-class activities for high school students focused on media literacy and college-level academic sources. Attendees will gain an understanding of how they may work with high school students in ways that go beyond a simple introduction to college-level resources.

Agenda

8:30-9:00
Breakfast and Check-in

  • Bagels, sweet breads, fruit, yogurt parfait, Granola bars, GF pastries

9-10:30
Welcome and Keynote (Moraine Rooms 1 & 2)

Dr. Nicole A Cooke–The Dark Side of Information Behavior

10:40-11:30 Breakout Sessions

  • “I use good sources when it counts for school, but am lazier at home”: The critical divide between young adults’ academic and personal news engagement behaviors (Moraine Room 1)
  • Integrating Information Literacy into Disciplinary Courses using Informed Learning Design (M201)
  • Collaborating with Students Beyond the Library for Increased Relevancy: An Early Career Librarian Perspective (M202)
  • Teaching a Stealth Information Literacy Course (M204)
  • There’s Wisdom in the Room: Inclusion in the Classroom (M210)
    • Handout Packet

11:40-12:30 Breakout Sessions

  • “What’s really going on here?”: Engaging and contextualizing the media landscape with high school students (Moraine Room 1)
  • Philosophy & News: A Partnership Model for Discipline Embedded Information Literacy (M201)
  • Adopt, Adapt and Improve: An Instruction Librarian Development Program You Can Implement TODAY* (*More or Less) (M202)
  • Passive Programming for Low-Stakes Student Engagement and Learning (M204)
  • The authority of unlikely voices: personal experience as knowledge (M210)

12:30-1:30 Lunch (Moraine Plaza)

Lunch: Deli sandwiches: Turkey, tuna, and roasted vegetable (gluten-free versions available), Southwest quinoa salad (gf and vegan), cookies, rice crispy treats, chips, fruit, granola bars

Coffee, Tea, Soda, and Water throughout the day

1:40-2:30 Breakout Sessions

  • The Mechanics of Skepticism: What Climate Change can Teach Us About Belief and Reason (Moraine Room 1)
  • Visual Thinking Strategies & ACRL’s Framework: How to encourage research confidence in undergraduates (M201)
  • Information Literacy in Innovation Competitions (M202)
  • Beyond the checklist: strengthening student’s critical thinking muscles in assessing information (M203-computer lab)
  • Meeting students where they are – online (M210)

2:40-3:30 Breakout Sessions

  • Accessibility of Database Vendor Produced Video Tutorials: Enhancing the Information Literacy Landscape (Moraine Room 1)
  • Exploring Power, Privilege, and Freedom of the Press in a Fake News World (M201)
  • Narrative Storytelling as Flipped Instruction: Using Media to Inspire Creativity in a New Information Landscape (M202)
  • Aligning the Curriculums for College Success: High School and College Library Collaborations (M204)
  • Not Tolerating Intolerance: Unpacking Critical Pedagogy in the Classroom (M210)

 

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  1. […] and second years at the university. We are currently sharing the results of this research with community college partners and with faculty and staff (as part of the 2018 DePaul University Teaching and Learning […]